Monthly Archives: October 2010

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This post is based on an email that was sent and in no way reflects the views and opinions of ''Met'' or Jamaicangroupiemet.com. To send in a story send your email to [email protected]

PARTY ORGY?

NOW MI ALWAYS HEAR BOUT BRITE MAN BUT MI NEVA SI ONE AS BRITE AS KARTEL YET TO RASS…. 4 OOMAN INA ONE PARTY AND U ALL A SUCK OUT ONE A DEM TONGUE? MI NUH HAVE A TING FI SEH TO U BUT MI HAVE SOMETHING FI SEH TO DI FOOL DEM WHEY LOWER DEMSELF FI A WALKING DEAD LIKE U LOWER THEM TO THAT…WHAT A TING! DIS MAN CLEARLYYYYYYY NUH RESPECT OOMAN UNDER NO KINDA CIRCUMSTANCE AND WILL NEVA RESPECT DEM!

FACEBOOK PATTAKYAT

”MI SAY MET DIS GAL YAH NOH TAP BEG AN CON HAR FRENS DEM PON FACEBOOK!
FIRST SHE CON A BREDDA A MOBAY $490 US WEY SHE WAS TO SOPPOSE TO USE AN BUY A LAPTOP AND DEN WEN SHE CUM A JAMAICA FI KIP BEACH TRIP SHE DOH CARRY DI LAPTOP AN DI BREDDA COULDNT GET BACK HIM MONEY DEN SHE TAKE A NEX BREDDA MONEY FI PAY BACK FI DI LAPTOP AN TELL THE GUY SAY SHE A GO FUND SUM PEOPLE PON TI TRIP DWL MI SAY DEN SHE MANNAGE FI CON A NEX MAN SUM MONEY TO! SHE USE TO CUM PON A WALL PON FACEBOOK BUT TRO SHE SHAME A BAYE FAKE PAGE SHE USE PON FACEBOOK SHE ALL CLAIM SHE DEY NEWYORK A LIVE LIFE WHEN SHE A DEAD FI HUNGRY!! SHE NEED JESAS AND DEVINE HELP SHE DOH HAVE NO LIMIT TO HOW SHE TIEF AND  LIE ON FACEBOOK SMDH LMSOA”

GOODMORNING

Psalm 105
1O give thanks unto the LORD; call upon his name: make known his deeds among the people.

2Sing unto him, sing psalms unto him: talk ye of all his wondrous works.

3Glory ye in his holy name: let the heart of them rejoice that seek the LORD.

4Seek the LORD, and his strength: seek his face evermore.

5Remember his marvellous works that he hath done; his wonders, and the judgments of his mouth;

6O ye seed of Abraham his servant, ye children of Jacob his chosen.

7He is the LORD our God: his judgments are in all the earth.

8He hath remembered his covenant for ever, the word which he commanded to a thousand generations.

9Which covenant he made with Abraham, and his oath unto Isaac;

10And confirmed the same unto Jacob for a law, and to Israel for an everlasting covenant:

11Saying, Unto thee will I give the land of Canaan, the lot of your inheritance:

12When they were but a few men in number; yea, very few, and strangers in it.

13When they went from one nation to another, from one kingdom to another people;

14He suffered no man to do them wrong: yea, he reproved kings for their sakes;

15Saying, Touch not mine anointed, and do my prophets no harm.

16Moreover he called for a famine upon the land: he brake the whole staff of bread.

17He sent a man before them, even Joseph, who was sold for a servant:

18Whose feet they hurt with fetters: he was laid in iron:

19Until the time that his word came: the word of the LORD tried him.

20The king sent and loosed him; even the ruler of the people, and let him go free.

21He made him lord of his house, and ruler of all his substance:

22To bind his princes at his pleasure; and teach his senators wisdom.

23Israel also came into Egypt; and Jacob sojourned in the land of Ham.

24And he increased his people greatly; and made them stronger than their enemies.

25He turned their heart to hate his people, to deal subtilly with his servants.

26He sent Moses his servant; and Aaron whom he had chosen.

27They shewed his signs among them, and wonders in the land of Ham.

28He sent darkness, and made it dark; and they rebelled not against his word.

29He turned their waters into blood, and slew their fish.

30Their land brought forth frogs in abundance, in the chambers of their kings.

31He spake, and there came divers sorts of flies, and lice in all their coasts.

32He gave them hail for rain, and flaming fire in their land.

33He smote their vines also and their fig trees; and brake the trees of their coasts.

34He spake, and the locusts came, and caterpillers, and that without number,

35And did eat up all the herbs in their land, and devoured the fruit of their ground.

36He smote also all the firstborn in their land, the chief of all their strength.

37He brought them forth also with silver and gold: and there was not one feeble person among their tribes.

38Egypt was glad when they departed: for the fear of them fell upon them.

39He spread a cloud for a covering; and fire to give light in the night.

40The people asked, and he brought quails, and satisfied them with the bread of heaven.

41He opened the rock, and the waters gushed out; they ran in the dry places like a river.

42For he remembered his holy promise, and Abraham his servant.

43And he brought forth his people with joy, and his chosen with gladness:

44And gave them the lands of the heathen: and they inherited the labour of the people;

45That they might observe his statutes, and keep his laws. Praise ye the LORD

INTERESTING~


TWO WATCH N EYESORE EVALASTING!

IS WHA DI DANCEHALL PPL DEM HAVE WID TRUDI GOODAS?

 

MI KNOW TRUDI N A FEW PPL  NUH TALK AND PPL A SEH A SHE TALK UP TINGS ELSE WHERE… TRUDI DOW APPEAR TO BE THAT TYPE ALTHOUGH I DOW KNOW HAR BUT MI KNOW HOW PEOPLE WICKED AND DEM WILL SEH ANYTING FI CAUSE MORE PROBLEM… SUH WID DAT PLUS DIS NEW FILE RELEASE……WHAT DID WE NOT KNOW ABOUT TRUDI? UNNO RINSE

EVELYN MASON

From cocaine to Christ – Evelyn Mason, the preacher rehabilitating deportees – because she too was twice deported
published: Tuesday | July 3, 2007



Evelyn Mason

Ross Sheil, Staff Reporter

A cocaine dealer, a two-time deportee who founded Land of Our Birth Ministries, assisting others forced to return to Jamaica – Evelyn Mason has always been a strong woman.

“Heinous, a very hard girl,” explains a male relative of the 51-year-old Evelyn, once known as ‘Yardie Pam’ or ‘Fat Pam’. “She knows how to seduce people, to manipulate them and influence them to traffic the drugs.”

In her London heyday Evelyn was so good at being feared, she never had to resort to violence. That was until she kidnapped a woman who stole from her in a drug deal. That woman fell three stories from an apartment block trying to escape the person now known to her Christian brothers and sisters as ‘Evangelist Mason’.

She was punished with a jail term of three and a quarter years before being deported to Jamaica in 1994. She still regards this as unfair – double jeopardy she calls it. However, she blames nothing but her own greed for becoming a drug dealer and before that, a prolific shoplifter.

Trouble

“I just wanted to do it big and done, than do it small because you are still going to get into trouble,” she says, explaining how she took over her jailed baby father’s drug business, and expanded it. However, the fall was hard, leaving her four children behind in her adopted country of 15 years, before her citizenship application could be completed.

“I came back to Jamaica a bitter and angry person. You see trouble can either make you a bitter or an angry person,” she explains. “I was very bitter because I had lost a lot. I lost my Mercedes Benz, my BMW car, I had lost my jewellery, I lost my home, my children were elsewhere, so it was back to base with nothing.”

Upon deportation her immediate intention was to “flood the UK with drugs”, as she freely admits.

With her family having relocated her children to the United States during her stay in prison, she began smuggling cocaine north. But it was the five-year jail time and her subsequent and second deportation from the United States, which saved her.

A drug mule arriving on the same flight had informed on her when collared. Threatening to kill the hapless mule, she terrorised him in the court room.

Back in her cell she began reading the Bible which led to her salvation and later in court, “I told him that I loved him – he thought I was mad!”

Calling

For the deportees who flood into Jamaica every week from the U.S., United Kingdom and Canada, her calling is more easily understood. Evelyn introduces a 63-year-old woman to The Gleaner – someone who might best understand her.

They shared jail time together but are from different levels in the hierarchy of the drug trade. Jackieis one of many poor Jamaican women who have become ‘drug mules’, smuggling cocaine out of the country, strapped to their bodies or intravenously.

Despite reported successes by law enforcement agencies at points of entry, for some such as Jackie, poverty can force them to try again.

Once she was caught and imprisoned when smuggling for Evelyn. Her situation has become desperate as she attempts to support two grandchildren who are still in school; her own offspring having died. She owes $20,000 to a smuggler who is ransoming her passport and valid six-month U.S. visa. It is a stark choice: sacrifice money she does not yet have to start her cook shop; or smuggle.

She does not look like a criminal and indeed many other deportees are not. In fact (29 per cent of all deportations between 1990 and 2005 were due to immigration breaches. Most deportations ordered by the U.K. were for this reason. However, the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) report that deportees are in charge of many criminal gangs.

By contrast, Jackie’s demeanour is of beaten resignation.

“Sometimes I do a day’s work an tings like dat. I don’t want to take more drugs. Mi jus’ want travel,” says Jackie. But asked whether she might yet resort to smuggling, if only to have these opportunities returned to her, she nods.

These days it is, of course, not cocaine, but packages donated by Food For the Poor, that Evelyn delivers to deportees like Jackie, who are unable to support themselves and their dependants. As a volunteer Evelyn’s resources – earned from preaching and motivational speaking – are stretched.

“We as dealers; that’s how we hang onto the people,” she explains of Jackie’s dilemma. “We have the money and we will lend you the money. It’s a deposit towards the work they are going to carry out for us. I would love to help to get back that $20,000 and take back that passport for her, but I don’t have $20,000.”

“It’s not easy!” she sighs.

Government persistently lobbies the ‘Big Deporting Three’ of the U.K., U.S. and Canada for more assistance, arguing that it is as much their problem being dumped on Jamaica. At home social interventions are essential to enable rehabilitation of deportees maintains 52-year-old David Mullings, who was ordered home from the U.S., where he moved with his family in 1969 and worked as a school guidance counsellor.

David considered forming his own organisation before coming into contact with Evelyn’s, who he assists on days like this.

Rehabilitation programme


Evelyn Mason, former drug dealer. – photos by Ross Sheil

Today is the arrival of the monthly ‘Con Air’ flight from the United States, bringing home deportees to be processed and inducted into Evelyn’s Deportee Rehabilitation and Reintegration Programme. Besides their particulars they are asked to state their health status, substance abuse and other needs – deficiencies she hopes to help them with.

“You are locked out of the equal opportunities available to the rest of society,” says David. While inside the church, the party of about 40 male deportees, are filling out documents and being interviewed by authorities. “If you do not have the support, it’s likely that you will do something wrong because without the support, what else can you do?!

Most of the men have family here, but for some like David, home was the deporting country, and they return to nothing. In these cases, Evelyn tries to find them a place at a halfway house, and on some occasions, in her own home.

Back inside the church Evelyn is exhorting the deportees to follow her example, which is met by loud applause from an understandably tired-looking audience. They will remain for several hours more until their processing is complete.

An alien culture

They, and others like them can be ‘wounded animals’, maintains Evelyn. They may be angry, as she was, helpless, or unable to find employment due to stigma or a lack of relevant skills or education. Those who have been away for long, often since their teenage years, must adjust to what has become an alien culture.

She resents the stigma that deportees boost the crime rate; and the argument advanced by government; and the recent study on the issue by the Ministry of National Security that there is a “strong correlation between increased deportation and increases in the murder rate”.

University of the West Indies Mona criminologist Professor Bernard Headley, has conducted his own research into criminal deportation, and strongly criticised that assertion when repeated in Parliament by Minister of National Security Dr. Peter Phillips last year.

One of Professor Headley’s students, 20-year-old Chenelle Taylor is assisting Evelyn during the summer months, having met her when she was invited to the university to make a presentation. With ambitions of becoming a forensic psychologist, Chenelle has an interest in the issue and shares Evelyn’s belief that deportee’s are over-stigmatised.

“The fact that she doesn’t have any funding from government, and pays out of her own pocket, is inspiring to me,” she says.

Apart from the assistance of fellow deportees and her socially aware student, notwithstanding support from the Church community, Evelyn remains a one-woman operation. Her ‘office’ is a single desk, allowed to her by Commissioner of Corrections Major Richard Reese, and only recently she acquired a laptop computer.

With the rate of deportations more than tripling in 15 years, between 1990 and 2005, reaching a total of 33,268, Evelyn believes she is struggling against what she terms an epidemic.

“I am hoping that when I speak out somebody will come forward and help, and yes, I will donate something,” she implores. “Everybody needs a fresh beginning, a new start in life, and if you don’t get it what are you going to do? It’s rough and somebody needs to say something.”

Name changed to protect identity.

http://landofmybirth.wordpress.com/

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